dirt

Blog

A Reflection on My Summer Watershed Internship

Posted on 08/03/16 by Claire in Euclid Creek Watershed

I have had the privilege of working as the watershed intern for the Cuyahoga Soil and Water Conservation District (CSWCD) this summer. My work and responsibilities have varied in the field and office. I have gained valuable experience and knowledge in watershed management. Improving and maintaining the health of Lake Erie watersheds is one of my main future... read more

Concrete Washout Pits & You

Posted on 07/26/16 by in Storm Water Services

A temporary and disposable concrete washout pit.

Such a common part of many construction sites that the inclusion of a concrete washout pit (CWOP) on a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) is second nature. Concrete washout is non-sediment pollutant that must be prevented from discharging off-site. It has an extremely high pH and contains other admixture chemicals. It is the responsibility of the permittee to... read more

Bikes, Bees & Butterflies

Posted on 07/19/16 by Amy in Educational Outreach

A pollinator bike garden that was placed in a park around the Shaker Lakes

Two years ago I was given the opportunity to work with my next door neighbor, Ann Cicarella, developing her new start-up business Bikes, Bees & Butterflies. What began as a hobby for Ann has now become her main priority. Ann is a retired landscape designer who made her mere interests become something so much more. She began Bikes,... read more

Mercury In Our Waterways

Posted on 07/12/16 by Amy in Educational Outreach

1. Main source of mercury in our waterways is from fossil fuel burning.

Mercury is a heavy metal element that can have serious effects on our waterways and aquatic ecosystems. It is a neurotoxin that has an effect on fish, wildlife, and humans. But how does mercury get into our waterways? The main source of mercury is from atmospheric deposition that is contracted through rain, snow, and dry particles. How does... read more

Project Permitting: Planning for the Paperwork

Posted on 07/05/16 by Brent in Storm Water Services

Wetlands require permitting by US Army Corps of Engineers and/or Ohio EPA

Planning a new construction project is a complicated matter that involves coordinating with many different agencies, design consultants, financiers, regulators, and other stakeholders. It's neither feasible nor timely to try and complete all necessary requirements one-by-one. As such, developers often work to accomplish the myriad of necessary tasks concurrently and manage competing requirements as they arise.... read more