dirt

Blog

Mercury In Our Waterways

Posted on 07/12/16 by Amy in Educational Outreach

1. Main source of mercury in our waterways is from fossil fuel burning.

Mercury is a heavy metal element that can have serious effects on our waterways and aquatic ecosystems. It is a neurotoxin that has an effect on fish, wildlife, and humans. But how does mercury get into our waterways? The main source of mercury is from atmospheric deposition that is contracted through rain, snow, and dry particles. How does... read more

Project Permitting: Planning for the Paperwork

Posted on 07/05/16 by Brent in Storm Water Services

Wetlands require permitting by US Army Corps of Engineers and/or Ohio EPA

Planning a new construction project is a complicated matter that involves coordinating with many different agencies, design consultants, financiers, regulators, and other stakeholders. It's neither feasible nor timely to try and complete all necessary requirements one-by-one. As such, developers often work to accomplish the myriad of necessary tasks concurrently and manage competing requirements as they arise.... read more

Monitoring Restorative Planting Sites in Euclid Creek

Posted on 07/01/16 by Claire in Euclid Creek Watershed

Annie monitoring native plant success at Bishop/Hawthorne site

On June 3, as part of my internship at Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District (CSWCD), I went out and monitored two conserved sites at Redstone Run in Richmond Heights and on Bishop/Hawthorne Rds. in Highland Heights. The sites are owned by the West Creek Conservancy with a Conservation Easement held and monitored by CSWCD. Both projects were... read more

A Glance into the Life of an Education Intern

Posted on 06/28/16 by Amy in Educational Outreach

Black Rat Snake eating a sparrow. Things you see at a wetlands workshop!

For the past month I have been working as the Education Intern here under Amy Roskilly, helping with Rain Barrel and Green Cleaning Workshops, tabling events, creating a native plant database, and even attending a wetland workshop! Before I get into all of that I would like to introduce myself. My name is Allie Dumas and I am a... read more

Downspout Disconnection: An Effective, Easy-to-Implement, Inexpensive Way to Reduce Rooftop Runoff

Posted on 06/21/16 by Jared in Educational Outreach

Photo Source: Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay, http://www.stormwater.allianceforthebay.org/take-action/structural-bmps/downspout-disconnect

Every river begins somewhere – its headwaters. In urban and suburban areas, idyllic, forested headwater streams are often replaced by storm sewers or roadside ditches. Instead of rainfall being intercepted by the forest canopy and slowly infiltrated into the ground, it is gathered by gutters, downspouts and catch basins before being routed off the landscape as quickly... read more