water

Euclid Creek

Who We Are

The Euclid Creek Watershed Program is made up of the Friends of Euclid Creek, the grassroots non-profit watershed group, the Euclid Creek Watershed Council, the nine communities that govern the program, and the Euclid Creek Watershed Coordinator, the program's full time staff housed at Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District.

Euclid Creek Watershed Council (ECWC)

The goals of the Euclid Creek Watershed Council are to promote inter-jurisdictional cooperation in addressing watershed issues in the Euclid Creek watershed, including cooperation with the Euclid Creek Watershed Coordinator to implement the Watershed Action Plan for the Euclid Creek.

In 2000, 10 municipalities in the Euclid Creek Watershed organized informally, with the assistance of the Northeast Ohio Areawide Coordinating Agency (NOACA), to form a Euclid Creek Watershed Council to address common environmental, storm water and development concerns in the Euclid Creek Watershed.

In 2001, NOACA obtained a grant from the Ohio Lake Erie Protection Fund to develop a regional storm water program model for USEPA’s Phase II program and to undertake a demonstration of the use of this model with Euclid Creek Communities. The Cuyahoga Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) served as the watershed coordinator for this demonstration effort.

In 2002, the Cuyahoga SWCD obtained a grant from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) for a Watershed Coordinator position for Euclid Creek to continue the Watershed Coordinator role for Euclid Creek. Consistent with the goals of the ODNR Watershed Coordinator Program, the purposes of this agreement are a) to facilitate development of a watershed plan for the Euclid Creek, and b) to promote coordinated participation of local units of government in the development of the plan.

Other goals of the Euclid Creek Watershed Council are to a) encourage broad based-stakeholder involvement in the watershed planning process, and b) to assist the member communities of the Euclid Creek Watershed Council in complying with the Phase II storm water program.

In 2004, the ECWC established by-laws as an operational organization with governance. 

Since 2004, the program has developed a Euclid Creek Watershed Action Plan, established an annual public involvement and education program plan, and brought over $3.7 million to implement its programs and to get watershed improvement projects recommended in the Watershed Action Plan on the ground.

Friends of Euclid Creek (FOEC)

The Friends of Euclid Creek (FOEC) is a non-profit 501(c)(3) advocacy organization which was organized in 2003 to support the development of a watershed action plan.  The goal of the FOEC organization is to advocate for the health of the Euclid Creek watershed.  The vision of FOEC is to serve as the citizen voice for the watershed.  And the mission of FOEC is to raise awareness about and preserve the natural features of the watershed. 

Organization History

2001 Group of six interested volunteers form Friends of Euclid Creek (FOEC) as response to development of Legacy Village and impact on natural resources in the watershed.
2001 City of Highland Heights is awarded $300,000 Clean Ohio grant to protect 12 acres for Dusty Goldenrod wetland meadow with endangered plants.
2002 FOEC members hold ‘A Day in the Park,’ festival and sign up 40 members and volunteers.
2003 FOEC receives non-profit status under state incorporation and Federal Internal Revenue Service.
2003-4 FOEC members participate in community events, educating public on watersheds and watershed issue; i.e., Greenwood Farm, Beachwood Green Dream, Lyndhurst Home Days, South Euclid Home Days.
2005 FOEC, partners of Cuyahoga Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) and John Carroll University ,to begin regular water quality monitoring of key sites in the watershed.
2005 Highland Heights turns down the Clean Ohio grant from Ohio Public Works Commission. FOEC adopts the grant and, with Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District, negotiates with property owner, Mayfield City Schools, assumes grant requirements and preserves the land.
2005 Completes Euclid Creek Watershed Action Plan.
2005 FOEC receives Ohio EPA Environmental Education Fund grant for organizational brochures and roadway signage, raising awareness about Euclid Creek watershed.
2005 FOEC members tour Baldwin Filtration Plant, learning the issues, cost and technology of drinking water protection.
2006 FOEC evaluates benefits and challenges of rain gardens in Euclid Creek; installs four demonstration gardens with educational signage in watershed communities. Grants are from Ohio Lake Erie Commission and Lake Erie Protection Fund.
2007 FOEC members tour Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District’s Easterly Treatment Plant, learning management issues of sewage discharge and control in Lake Erie.
2008 FOEC receives service award as ‘Watershed of the Year’ from Ohio Lake Erie Commission.
2009 FOEC receives $1.4 million Great Lakes Restoration Initiative award for restoration and redesign of Wildwood Park estuary.
2009 FOEC accepts donation of Marcella Road 1 acre parcel along the Creek in Cleveland. Cleans and plants trees on the property.
2010 FOEC establishes $500 college scholarship for high school seniors living in the watershed.
2010 FOEC, with Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District complete and celebrate removal of a low-head dam on the East Branch of Euclid Creek.
2011 FOEC members hold driving tour of upper Cuyahoga River Watershed.
2012 FOEC receives $182,000 Clean Ohio Fund award for preservation of Redstone Run 8- acre riparian area in Richmond Heights.
2013 FOEC completes strategic plan for short- and long term organizational plan.
2013 FOEC and CSWCD contractors complete Wildwood lacustrine wetland construction of wetlands.
2013 FOEC members participate with Cuyahoga RAP in ‘releaf’ planting on Euclid Creek estuary in Richmond Heights.
2013 FOEC begins fund drive, Land Conservation Fund, to raise $20,000 for closing costs on Richmond eights property.
FOEC members, in partnership with Cuyahoga SWCD, volunteer at numerous rain barrel workshops.
FOEC members conduct and aid in beach and stream cleanups, invasive plant removals, and water quality monitoring every year.

FOEC Organization Profile

The membership of Friends of Euclid Creek is comprised of approximately 130 citizens from nine communities located within the Euclid Creek watershed. Membership is granted via payment of annual dues. FOEC provides monthly educational meetings and/or field trips for member and friends. All meetings are open and free for the public.
A watershed coordinator, retained by Cuyahoga Soil & Water District (CSWCD) manages the water conservation and education work of FOEC.
A 10-member board directs FOEC’s activities. The Board is comprised of four officers and six directors. The Board structure and responsibilities may be as follows:

  • President - planning, implementation of strategic plan
  • Vice President - Communication
  • Treasurer - Finance, fundraising, budget
  • Secretary - Records, correspondence, scholarship
  • Director - Programs
  • Director - Communication
  • Director - Finance & Development
  • Director - Membership
  • Director - Volunteers
  • Director - Special projects

Committees may develop in support of any of the above categories.

Euclid Creek Watershed Coordinator

The Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District houses the Euclid Creek Watershed Coordinator, the Program’s full time staff person who implements the Euclid Creek Watershed Action Plan and acts as the liaison between the ECWC and FOEC.  The Coordinator also assists with the implementation of the public involvement and public education (PIPE) components of the NPDES Phase II of the Euclid Creek watershed. 

The Coordinator’s position is funded through a Memorandum of Understanding with the nine participating Euclid Creek Watershed Council communities, as well as through an ODNR watershed coordinator grant, through FOEC’s NEORSD Operating Support grant from years past, and through considerable in-kind support of the Cuyahoga Soil and Water Conservation District (e.g. benefits package, office space, use of equipment and SWCD vehicles, etc.).