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Acacia Restoration

From Golf Course to Restored Nature in a Public Park

Former Acacia Country Club in Lyndhurst became a Cleveland Metropark Reservation in 2012. The property transfer from the Conservation Fund requires that Acacia be restored to a primarily natural state. The Metroparks is working to restore the 155-acre property at the headwaters of the Euclid Creek Watershed.

Former Acacia Country Club in Lyndhurst became a Cleveland Metropark Reservation in 2012. The Metroparks is working to restore the 155-acre property at the headwaters of the Euclid Creek Watershed. Restoration of such a large property will have a dramatic impact on the health of the watershed downstream. By reforesting portions of the property, daylighting sections of the creek that are underground in pipes, and recreating wetlands we will see improvements in water quality and reductions in the volume of storm water running into the Main Branch of Euclid Creek over time.

The property transfer from the Conservation Fund requires that Acacia be restored to a primarily natural state similar to Euclid Creek and Chagrin Reservations. City Council members, residents, consultants, educators, and community groups provided input on how the restoration could look. Suggestions included storm water management techniques utilizing the existing sand traps, wetlands creation, restoring floodplains and meadows, outdoor education opportunities; the ideas were abundant. Cleveland Metroparks staff appreciated the input provided that will inform the restoration planning efforts moving forward.

Jennifer Greiser from Cleveland Metroparks recently gave a webinar about restoration projects at Acacia. You can watch the webinar by clicking on the following link. Navigate to Page 3 of the webinar to listen to the 40 minute presentation.

Sarah Eysenbach from Cleveland Metroparks recently gave a webinar about plant establishment and monitoring at Acacia. You can watch the webinar by clicking on the following link.